Note to Not-For-Profits: Don’t Ignore Sales Tax

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Making assumptions when it comes to sales and use tax is ill-advised for any entity’s approach to compliance.  This is especially the case for not-for-profits.  Exemption from federal income tax can count for nothing in the sales and use tax world, and states are anything but uniform when it comes to exemptions available for not-for-profits.  Even when there are sales and use tax exemptions available for not-for-profits, it’s essential to ensure that all administrative requirements are followed in order to properly claim the exemption.

At the very least, all not-for-profits need to ask themselves three questions when it comes to sales and use tax: What states? What purchases? What sales?

What States?

No entity, not-for-profit or otherwise, will have a sales and use tax payment or collection obligation unless a state has jurisdiction over the entity.  In the state tax world, this concept is known as “nexus.” For sales and use tax, an entity needs to have a physical presence in the state before a state can have jurisdiction to tax it.  Many taxpayers mistakenly interpret the “physical presence” test to mean a substantial permanent presence – for example, having an office in a state.  Clearly, an office location in a state would be considered a physical presence by all states, but many other in-state activities can constitute nexus.  For example, a physical presence can be established by having a telecommuter in a state, having employees temporarily in a state, or having independent contractors in a state performing services for the not-for-profit.

What Purchases?

Once a not-for-profit determines that it has nexus with a state, it must determine if any of its purchases being made in the state are subject to sales tax.  Many states have sales and use tax exemptions for purchases made by not-for-profits, but these exemptions vary significantly in terms of which not-for-profits are exempt and the scope of the purchases that are exempt.  For example, California only provides sales and use tax exemptions for purchases made by entities meeting its rather narrow definition of a “charitable organization.”  Further, if an entity meets that definition, the only purchases that are exempt from sales and use tax are those that are made for the purpose of donation by the organization. All purchases of supplies (such as tools and office supplies) are not exempt.  Under these rules, most associations and membership organizations (i.e., non-IRC 501(c)(3) entities) would be taxable on all of its purchases.

Other states, such as Maryland and Ohio, have broader exemptions on purchases made by not-for-profits, but even in these states the exemption does not apply to all entities that may be exempt from federal income tax.  Further, most states require not-for-profits qualifying for a sales tax exemption to obtain an exemption certificate from the applicable taxing authority, which must be provided to vendors at the time of purchase.

What Sales?

Not-for-profits also need to be aware if its sales of products or services are subject to a state’s sales and use tax.  If a not-for-profit’s sales are subject to sales tax, then it must register to collect and remit sales tax to the state.   Merchandise sold, training materials (i.e. tangible or digital), software applications, access to a database, and subscriptions to publications are items to which not-for-profits need to pay particular attention.  States often have exemptions for certain sales of admissions to events hosted by not-for-profits and sales of food and beverages items.  Sales of merchandise are typically subject to sales and use tax.  This is especially the case when a not-for-profit has a permanent retail store, as opposed to sales that are isolated in nature.  For example, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, and Pennsylvania generally impose their sales tax on sales made by not-for-profits unless the sales meet the applicable rule pertaining to isolated/occasional sales.

It’s important for not-for-profits to be proactive in the area of sales and use tax.  When activities are expanded to new states, whether from hiring an in-state employee or frequently hosting conferences or seminars in a state, not-for-profits should immediately look into whether it will be making any purchases or sales that may result in a sales tax compliance obligation.  Being reactive can result in penalties, interest, and the practical in-ability to recoup uncollected taxes.

If you have any questions about sales and use tax, please contact your Aronson tax advisor or Michael L. Colavito, Jr. at 301-231-6200.

 

About Michael Colavito, Jr.

Michael Colavito, Jr. has written 55 post in this blog.

Michael L. Colavito, Jr. is a senior manager in Aronson LLC’s Tax Services Group, where he provides multi-state taxation services pertaining to income, franchise, sales and use, and property taxes. Michael’s experience also includes representing clients at all stages of tax controversy, from audit through appellate litigation, and advising them on restructurings, state tax refund and planning opportunities.

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